Stone-curlew

Stone-curlew had been in serious decline in the last few decades but with concerted conservation work numbers are now increasing. A summer visitor, that is a secretive species and prone to disturbance, it is particular to open heathland and grassland with little vegetation and sometimes arable fields. It was found along the Sandlings that stretched…

Bittern

Bittern in Suffolk The Bittern, a fairly secretive member of the heron family, can be found in the reedbeds and meres of Suffolk. Often noted skulking along the edge of reedbeds and in flight across them, there are a few sites where this species can be found in Suffolk including a couple that offer excellent…

Avocet

Avocet in Suffolk The Avocet, a characteristic wader of marsh and scrape, which is now commonly seen along the coast as well as new inland sites along the estuaries of Suffolk, was a species that had become extinct in the UK as a breeding species in the nineteenth century. It returned to breed, due to…

Dartford Warbler

Dartford Warbler in Suffolk At first glance heathland may look devoid of non-plant life altogether; but closer study will reveal a wealth of life including; insects, reptiles and birds. There is one very special iconic Suffolk bird which should always be sought out on a heath.  It is the intriguingly named, diminutive but subtly beautiful,…

Bearded Tit

Bearded Tit in Suffolk Often referred to as the ‘beardy’, the bearded tit is clearly a miss-named bird; as it is neither bearded or a tit! It was once thought to be unique for being Europe’s only member of the Asian babbler family. However, more recent research suggests it is even more unique than that…

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier in Suffolk A species that was in serious decline with only one pair remaining in the country in 1971, this was at Minsmere RSPB reserve. The species began to build in numbers thanks to the suitable habitat on the Suffolk coast, where today it is still one of its strongholds and can easily…

Nightingale

Nightingales in Suffolk The first encounters with a nightingale come when you can start looking, or perhaps a better description, listening for a nightingale in early April. Nightingales are summer visitors to Suffolk and they usually appear in the county around the second week of the month.  Always a difficult bird to see, it becomes…