Suffolk bird list & recording

A GUIDE TO RECORDING BIRDS IN SUFFOLK
 
Introduction

The foundation stone of any report is the data upon which it is based. Unless we all submit our records diligently, and in a usable form, then the Suffolk Bird Report will not be a comprehensive account of the birds recorded in Suffolk.

The system

The recording of the county’s avifauna is the responsibility of the Suffolk Naturalists’ Society, working in close co-operation with the Suffolk Ornithologists’ Group. The linchpins of the system are the Recorders, who are the initial point of contact for all records. Because of the volume of records in Suffolk the county has been divided into three areas. See the inside front cover for a map and addresses.

  Observers are reminded that Suffolk works to Watsonian vice-county boundaries, taking in areas that are now administered as Norfolk, Cambridgeshire or Essex. The most significant area affected is that of Lothingland, the northern limits of which follow the River Yare and include the south side of Breydon Water. We have retained these original boundaries as we feel that sensible comparison of data can only be made from year to year if the recording area is kept constant.

Submission of records

All observers are requested to submit their records monthly. We also suggest that the following format be followed:

  • Location (precise place name from the Ordnance Survey map plus parish if ambiguous). OS grid reference should be added if in any doubt or if reporting breeding locations.
  • Species
  • Date
  • Name and address of observer
  • Sex/age – male, female, juvenile etc.
  • Abundance – count numbers, frequency, etc.
  • Type of record – dead, ringed, etc.
  • Other comments considered relevant – behaviour etc. In particular see the list below for particular information required for each species. All claims of national rarities should, of course, be accompanied by a full description. The Recorder will automatically forward this to the British Birds Rarities Committee (BBRC).

If submitting a list of records for one particular site, please put all details at the top of the list and annotate with sex and/or frequency. Remember, if in any doubt as to the value of any record, please send it in!

A spreadsheet is available for submitting records and can be downloaded from the SOG website. This can be sent electronically to the Recorders and is a much easier and quicker method for them. Whilst this is not essential, we would encourage all those who can to use this method of submitting their records.

The county is divided in to three parts with there respective recorders below.

West Area Recorder – Colin Jakes, 7 Maltward Avenue, Bury St.Edmunds IP33 3XN Tel:01284 702215 colin@jakes.myzen.co.uk

North-East Area Recorder – Andrew Green, 17 Cherrywood, Harleston, Norfolk IP20 9LP Tel:07766 900063 andrew@waveney1.fsnet.co.uk

South-East Area Recorder – Scott Mayson, 8 St.Edmunds Close, Springfields, Woodbridge, IP12 4UY Tel:01394 385595 smsuffolkbirder@gmail.com

Suffolk-recorders-map

Suffolk recorders map

Assessment of records

All records come under the scrutiny of the Suffolk Ornithological Records Committee (SORC) and for rare or scarce species, verification is sought – i.e. photographs, field sketches, witnesses, sound recordings (for calling or singing birds) and (most importantly) written descriptions. The SORC’s policy for vagrants, classified as national rarities, is clear; records should be channelled through the County Recorder to be considered by the British Birds Rarities Committee (BBRC), whose decisions are accepted by SORC. A full list of species that are considered by the SORC follows. The committee may also request further details regarding any other species that, in the opinion of the committee, is out of context in terms of season, habitat or numbers.

  A list of records which have not been accepted for publication can be found in Appendix III and includes those which have been circulated to the respective committees but were considered unacceptable due to either the identification not being fully established or, more rarely, a genuine mistake having been made. It does not include records still under consideration.

Craig Fulcher, the SORC secretary can be contacted here – SORC. The recording forms for both SORC and BBRC can be downloaded here – SORC submission form and BBRC report form.

Guide to species – Suffolk Bird Report 2015

The following list shows all the species recorded in the county and thus this is also a checklist for Suffolk. For any species not listed, a full description will be required. The list shows those species accepted into Categories A, B and C, as per the British Ornithologists’ Union (see the Introduction to the Systematic List for more details). Note that a large number of species included can also fall into Categories D and E (basically as escapees); a description of such a bird may be requested but will be essential if it is believed that the bird is of wild origin.

 A reminder that Turtle Dove, Yellow Wagtail, Nightingale, Spotted Flycatcher, Marsh Tit and Corn Bunting have all been moved from Category 4 to category 3 – records of all of them would be appreciated.

 A reminder that Black-throated Diver and Grey Phalarope have been moved from 3 to 2, especially for those seen at sea.

SOG/SORC would also like to receive any breeding records for the following species: Kestrel, Ringed Plover, Lapwing, Common Snipe, Curlew, Redshank, Common Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Common Swift, Sand and House Martin (colonies), Mistle Thrush, Willow Warbler and Reed Bunting.

 There have been a few changes of category from BBRC over the past years and they are here as a reminder:-

Moving from Category 1 to 2 are Lesser Scaup, Penduline Tit, Blyth’s Reed Warbler and Citrine Wagtail. SORC, of course, will still require descriptions of these species

Moving from Category 2 to 1 are Aquatic Warbler, Tawny Pipit, Red-throated Pipit and Rustic Bunting. Descriptions of these species will need to be sent to BBRC.

Black-browed Albatross is added to the Suffolk list in 2015.

The Suffolk Bird List
Mute Swan 4
Tundra (Bewick’s) Swan 3
Whooper Swan 3
Bean Goose    Tundra

Taiga

3

2

Pink-footed Goose 3
Greater White-fronted Goose 3
Greylag Goose 4
Snow Goose 1
Greater Canada Goose 4
Barnacle Goose 3
Brent Goose    Dark-bellied 4
                        Pale-bellied 3
                        Black Brant 2
Red-breasted Goose 1
Egyptian Goose 3
Ruddy Shelduck * 1
Common Shelduck 4
Mandarin Duck 4
Eurasian Wigeon 4
American Wigeon 2
Gadwall 4
Baikal Teal 1
Eurasian Teal 4
Green-winged Teal 2
Mallard 4
Northern Pintail 4
Garganey 3
Blue-winged Teal 1
Northern Shoveler 4
Red-crested Pochard 3
Common Pochard 3
Ring-necked Duck 2
Ferruginous Duck 2
Tufted Duck 4
Greater Scaup 3
Lesser Scaup 2
Common Eider 3
King Eider 1
Long-tailed Duck

Common Scoter

33
Surf Scoter 1
Velvet Scoter 3
Bufflehead 1
Common Goldeneye 4
Smew 3
Red-breasted Merganser 3
Goosander 3
Ruddy Duck 2
Red-legged Partridge 4
Grey Partridge 3
Common Quail 3
Common Pheasant 4
Golden Pheasant 3
Red-throated Diver 3
Black-throated Diver 2
Great Northern Diver 3
White-billed Diver 1
Black-browed Albatross 1
Northern Fulmar 4
Cory’s Shearwater 2
Great Shearwater 2
Sooty Shearwater 3
Manx Shearwater 3
Balearic Shearwater 2
European Storm-petrel 2
Leach’s Storm-petrel 3
Northern Gannet 3
Great Cormorant 4
European Shag 3
Great Bittern 3
Little Bittern 1
Black-crowned Night-heron 2
Squacco Heron 1
Cattle Egret 2
Little Egret 3
Great Egret 3
Grey Heron 4
Purple Heron 2
Black Stork 1
White Stork 2
Glossy Ibis 2
Eurasian Spoonbill 3
Little Grebe 4
Great Crested Grebe 4
Red-necked Grebe 3
Slavonian Grebe 3
Black-necked Grebe 3
European Honey-buzzard 2
Black Kite 2
Red Kite 3
White-tailed Eagle 2
Eurasian Marsh Harrier 3
Hen Harrier 3
Pallid  Harrier 1
Montagu’s Harrier 2
Northern Goshawk 2
Eurasian Sparrowhawk 3
Common Buzzard 3
Rough-legged Buzzard 2
Greater Spotted Eagle* 1
Osprey 3
Lesser Kestrel 1
Common Kestrel 4
Red-footed Falcon 2
Merlin 3
Eurasian Hobby 3
Eleonora’s Falcon 1
Gyr Falcon 1
Peregrine Falcon 3
Water Rail 3
Spotted Crake 2
Little Crake 1
Baillons Crake* 1
Corncrake 2
Common Moorhen 4
Allen’s Gallinule* 1
Common Coot 4
Common Crane 3
Sandhill Crane 1
Little Bustard 1
Macqueen’s Bustard 1
Great Bustard 1
Eurasian Oystercatcher 4
Black-winged Stilt 1
Pied Avocet 3
Stone-curlew 3
Cream-coloured Courser* 1
Collared Pratincole 1
Oriental Pratincole 1
Black-winged Pratincole 1
Little Ringed Plover 3
Ringed Plover 4
Killdeer 1
Kentish Plover 2
Greater Sand Plover 1
Eurasian Dotterel 2
American Golden Plover 2
Pacific Golden Plover 1
European Golden Plover 4
Grey Plover 4
Sociable Lapwing 1
Northern Lapwing 4
Great Knot 1
Red Knot 4
Sanderling 3
Semipalmated Sandpiper 1
Little Stint 3
Temminck’s Stint 3
White-rumped Sandpiper 2
Baird’s Sandpiper 1
Pectoral Sandpiper 3
Curlew Sandpiper 3
Stilt Sandpiper 1
Purple Sandpiper 3
Dunlin 4
Broad-billed Sandpiper 1
Buff-breasted Sandpiper 2
Ruff 3
Jack Snipe 3
Common Snipe 4
Great Snipe 1
Long-billed Dowitcher 1
Eurasian Woodcock 3
Black-tailed Godwit 4
Bar-tailed Godwit 3
Whimbrel 4
Eurasian Curlew 4
Terek Sandpiper 1
Common Sandpiper 3
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Green Sandpiper 3
Spotted Redshank 3
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Common Greenshank 3
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Marsh Sandpiper 1
Wood Sandpiper 3
Common Redshank 4
Ruddy Turnstone 4
Wilson’s  Phalarope 1
Red-necked Phalarope 2
Grey Phalarope 2
Pomarine Skua 3
Arctic Skua 3
Long-tailed Skua 3
Great Skua 3
Ivory Gull 1
Sabine’s Gull 2
Kittiwake 4
Slender-billed Gull 1
Black-headed Gull 4
Little Gull 3
Ross’s Gull 1
Laughing Gull 1
Franklin’s Gull 1
Mediterranean Gull 3
Audouin’s Gull 1
Common Gull 4
Ring-billed Gull 2
Lesser Black-backed Gull 4
Herring Gull 4
Yellow-legged Gull 3
Caspian Gull 3
Iceland Gull 3
Glaucous Gull 3
Great Black-backed Gull 4
Sooty Tern 1
Little Tern 4
Gull-billed Tern 1
Caspian Tern 1
Whiskered Tern 1
Black Tern 3
White-winged Black Tern 2
Sandwich Tern 4
Lesser Crested Tern 1
Common Tern 4
Roseate Tern 3
Arctic Tern 3
Common Guillemot 3
Razorbill 3
Black Guillemot 2
Little Auk 3
Atlantic Puffin 3
Pallas’s Sandgrouse* 1
Feral Pigeon 4
Stock Pigeon 4
Common Wood Pigeon 4
Eurasian Collared Dove 4
European Turtle Dove 3
Oriental Turtle Dove 1
Rose-ringed Parakeet 3
Great Spotted Cuckoo 1
Common Cuckoo 3
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
Barn Owl 3
Eurasian Scops Owl* 1
Snowy Owl 1
Little Owl 3
Tawny Owl 3
Long-eared Owl 3
Short-eared Owl 3
Tengmalm’s Owl* 1
European Nightjar 3
Common Swift 4
Pallid Swift 1
Pacific Swift 1
Alpine Swift 2
Common Kingfisher 3
European Bee-eater 2
European Roller 1
Hoopoe 3
Eurasian Wryneck 3
Green Woodpecker 4
Great Spotted Woodpecker 4
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker 3
Red-eyed Vireo 1
Eurasian Golden Oriole 3
Isabelline Shrike 1
Red-backed Shrike 3
Lesser Grey Shrike 1
Great Grey Shrike 3
Southern Grey Shrike 1
Woodchat Shrike 2
Red-billed Chough* 2
Black-billed Magpie 4
Eurasian Jay 4
Spotted Nutcracker 1
Eurasian Jackdaw 4
Rook 4
Carrion Crow 4
Hooded Crow 2
Common Raven 2
Goldcrest 4
Firecrest 3
Eurasian Penduline Tit 2
Blue Tit 4
Great Tit 4
Crested Tit 2
Coal Tit 4
Willow Tit 2
Marsh Tit 3
Bearded Tit 3
Greater Short-toed Lark 2
Crested Lark 1
Wood Lark 4
Sky Lark 4
Horned (Shore) Lark 3
Sand Martin 4
Barn Swallow 4
House Martin 4
Red-rumped Swallow 2
Cetti’s Warbler 3
Long-tailed Tit 4
Greenish Warbler 2
Arctic Warbler 1
Pallas’ Leaf Warbler 2
Yellow-browed Warbler 3
Hume’s Leaf Warbler 1
Radde’s Warbler 2
Dusky Warbler 2
Western Bonelli’s Warbler 1
Wood Warbler 3
Common Chiffchaff 4
     Siberian Chiffchaff 2
Willow Warbler 4
Blackcap 4
Garden Warbler 4
Barred Warbler 3
Lesser Whitethroat 4
Common Whitethroat 4
Spectacled Warbler 1
Dartford Warbler 3
Marmora’s Warbler 1
Subalpine Warbler 2
Sardinian Warbler 1
Lanceolated Warbler 1
Common Grasshopper Warbler 3
River Warbler 1
Savi’s Warbler 1
Olivaceous Warbler 1
Booted Warbler 1
Icterine Warbler 2
Melodious Warbler 2
Aquatic Warbler 1
Sedge Warbler 4
Paddyfield Warbler 1
Blyth’s Reed Warbler 2
Marsh Warbler 2
Eurasian Reed Warbler 4
Great Reed Warbler 1
Bohemian Waxwing 3
Wood Nuthatch 3
Eurasian Treecreeper 3
Short-toed Treecreeper 1
Winter Wren 4
Common Starling 4
Rosy Starling 2
White-throated Dipper 2
White’s Thrush 1
Ring Ouzel 3
Common Blackbird 4
Fieldfare 4
Song Thrush 4
Redwing 4
Mistle Thrush 4
Spotted Flycatcher 3
European Robin 4
Thrush Nightingale 1
Common Nightingale 3
Bluethroat 2
Siberian Blue Robin 1
Red-flanked Bluetail 1
Black Redstart 3
Common Redstart 3
Whinchat 3
Stonechat 3
Siberian Stonechat 1
Isabelline Wheatear 1
Northern Wheatear 3
Pied Wheatear 1
Desert Wheatear 1
White-crowned Wheatear

(White-tailed Wheatear)

1
Red-breasted Flycatcher 2
Collared Flycatcher 1
Pied Flycatcher 3
Hedge Accentor 4
Alpine Accentor 1
House Sparrow 4
Spanish Sparrow 1
Eurasian Tree Sparrow 3
Yellow Wagtail 3
     Blue-headed Wagtail 3
     Grey-headed Wagtail 3
     Black-headed Wagtail 1
     Ashy-headed Wagtail 2
Citrine Wagtail 2
Grey Wagtail 3
Pied Wagtail 4
      White Wagtail 3
Richard’s Pipit 2
Blyth’s Pipit 1
Tawny Pipit 1
Olive-backed Pipit 2
Tree Pipit 3
Meadow Pipit 4
Red-throated Pipit 1
Rock Pipit 3
Water Pipit 3
Chaffinch 4
Brambling 3
European Serin 2
European Greenfinch 4
European Goldfinch 4
Eurasian Siskin 4
Common Linnet 4
Twite 3
Lesser Redpoll 3
Common (Mealy) Redpoll 3
Arctic Redpoll 2
Two-barred Crossbill 1
Common Crossbill 3
Parrot Crossbill 2
Trumpeter Finch 1
Common Rosefinch 2
Eurasian Bullfinch 3
Hawfinch 3
Snow Bunting 3
Lapland Longspur 3
Lark Sparrow 1
White-throated Sparrow 1
Pine Bunting 1
Yellowhammer 4
Cirl Bunting 2
Ortolan Bunting 2
Rustic Bunting 1
Little Bunting 2
Yellow-breasted Bunting 1
Reed Bunting 4
Black-headed Bunting 1
Corn Bunting 3

Key:* not recorded as wild since at least 1949.

1   National Rarity – detailed description required.

2   County Rarity – notes detailing observation will always be required.

3   All records requested – supporting notes may be requested.

4 Specific records – records of breeding, large counts, earliest/latest dates, unusual inland records or migration/weather-related movements requested.